General Topics

DiskTester

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Tips and How-To

Troubleshooting

Troubleshooting: Permissions

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Mac OS X Lion and Mountain Lion have a “sandboxing” feature that prevents DiskTester from accessing the boot drive (system drive) for its various tests.

ERROR: access denied [-5000]

Mac OS X Lion -5000 error

Mac OS X Lion has a “sandboxing” feature that prevents DiskTester from accessing the boot drive (system drive). See the two options for working around this security restriction.

The workaround is to run the command line (Terminal) version of DiskTester using 'sudo', which will prompt for a password and thus allow permission. Be sure to install the command line tools first (found in the diglloydTools folder once installed).

Start Terminal, then use sudo as shown in this example (using your own desired command):

diglloyd:~ lloyd$ sudo disktester recondition "Macintosh HD"

Command line workaround

The workaround is to run the command line (Terminal) version of DiskTester using 'sudo', which will prompt for a password and thus allow permission. Be sure to install the command line tools first (found in the diglloydTools folder once installed).

Start Terminal, then use sudo as shown in this example (using your own desired command):

diglloyd:~ lloyd$ sudo disktester recondition "Macintosh HD"

This technique works for most permissions errors (when Mac OS X denies access to a program, typically -5000 error, this is not specific to DiskTester).

GUI workaround

You can use the Launch As Root program to launch the DiskTester GUI with permissions suitable for getting the test done. I’m definitely not a fan of giving anything root permission, but this gets the job done.

 

Your login account does not have the right to create a test file on the volume; it is forbidden by the permissions on that volume.

This is not a malfunction or bug. Although DiskTester runs as a user-mode program, it cannot create a test file on a volume when permissions disallow it. Create an admin account and test using that account.

Suggested workarounds on other OS version

1) If your account is not an administrator account, create one System Preferences => Users, and test using it.

2) If this is not the boot volume (startup volume), do a Get Info on the volume, then check the box Ignore Ownership on This Volume. Be sure to change it back when done, unless you prefer it that way.

3) If neither of those works, most likely an administrator has set up your system this way deliberately. To test, you’ll have to change the permissions. In some cases the Get Info window for the volume will allow you to make the necessary change: you need “Read & Write” permission for your login account on the volume.